CU Boulder logo

Bioastronautics Research Group

This specialty area of Aerospace Engineering Sciences encompasses biological, behavioral and medical aspects governing humans and other living organisms in a space flight environment; and includes design of payloads, spacesuits, spacecraft habitats and life support systems.

In short, Bioastronautics spans the study and support of life in space.

See also:  Summary of Bioastronautics Student Awards
 
Current Bioastronautics Research Students
 

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Cristine

 

Christine Fanchiang, PhD Student

Human Spacecraft Operability

Christine Fanchiang received her Bachelor’s Degree in Aerospace Engineering from MIT and is now in the doctoral program in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder with an emphasis in Bioastronautics.  Her research focuses on defining an operability index for human-rating space vehicles to better understand the effects of spacecraft design on crew performance.  Her other interests include researching new technologies for regenerative life support systems and developing a long-term lunar outpost.  Before starting graduate studies, she worked at Northrop Grumman for three years as a Systems Engineer helping their systems integration team on the next generation polar-orbiting weather satellite, NPOESS. And while completing her MS degree at CU, Christine worked as a payload developer for BioServe Space Technologies. She is currently a Research Assistant with the FAA Center of Excellence for Commercial Space Transportation in analyzing considerations for defining future commercial human spaceflight regulations.

Additional Info:

http://www.colorado.edu/news/features/cu-students-help-nasa-develop-astronaut-food

http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2010/05/11/three-payloads-built-cu-boulder-set-launch-space-shuttle-atlantis

http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/academic-programs/online-courses-allow-flexibility-and-campus-learning

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies, 2009-11; FAA Center of Excellence for Commercial Space Transportation (COE for CST), 2011-2013, NASA Harriett G. Jenkins Graduate Fellowship, 2013-present

last updated December 2013

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Robert

 

Robert Ocampo, PhD Student

Human Spacecraft Safety

Robert Ocampo received his undergraduate degree from Haverford College, where he majored in Biology and Psychology.  While at Haverford, Robert earned his EMT certification and competed in cross-country and track and field.  He also served as an intern with NASA’s Spaceflight and Life Sciences Training Program, studying Arabidopsis growth in simulated spaceflight environments. In 2004, Robert began work as a Research Technologist at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, where he studied the effects of motion experience on human vestibular function.  This topic later became the focus of his master’s thesis in Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT.  During his time at MIT, Robert earned his private pilot’s license, and served as vice president and president of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology Student Association. After graduating from MIT, Robert began training as an Airframe & Powerplant (A&P) mechanic, earning both FAA ratings in 2010.  He also began diving professionally as a PADI-certified Divemaster. Additionally, Robert continued to pursue his education in emergency medicine, becoming an Emergency First Response Instructor, Rescue Diver, and Wilderness EMT in 2009. Robert finds great joy in exploring the world.  He’s both walked and bicycled across the country (thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail in 2004 and riding his bike from Boston to San Francisco in 2008), and summited over 250 peaks, including 21 mountains over 14,000’.  Robert began his PhD studies at CU in July 2011 and is exploring a thesis topic involving Spacecraft Human Rating.

 

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  Sierra Nevada Corporation under NASA CCDev2, 2011-12, CCiCap 2012-2014

last updated September 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Luis

 

Luis Zea, PhD Candidate

Bacterial Susceptibility to Antibiotics in Microgravity

Luis Zea began pursuing his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering with emphasis in Bioastronautics at CU Boulder in the Fall of 2010. His doctoral thesis focuses on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and utilizing microgravity as a novel environment to investigate it. He invests time on STEM outreach but also enjoys talking to the public on the benefits of human space exploration.  Luis started his career with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala. He then worked at ExxonMobil for two years. He studied German in Munich in 2006 and later that year started a M.S. in Aerospace Engineering – Thermofluids Track – at the University of Central Florida. There, Luis was involved with the design and manufacture of a cubesat that won 1st place in the Florida University Satellite program as well as with the Mars Desert Research Station, where he was an engineer for Crew 65. He also conducted research at the Florida Space Institute on gas kinetics on multi-phase flow. After graduation, he continued working for UCF as a Research Project Manager on a CO2 Removal Project. He then worked at Siemens Energy Inc. as a Heat Transfer Engineer, leading a multinational team of engineers in the design and construction of a new heat exchanger. Luis is a certified lifeguard, scuba diver and aside of English, is fluent in German, Spanish and Portuguese and has a basic knowledge of French.

 

Additional Info:  http://underseacolony.com/core/crew/luis-zea.php   http://www.intl.ucf.edu/index.cfm?PageID=226      http://www.astronauts4hire.org/2009/12/zea.html

 

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: Petrobras 2006-08, BioServe Space Technologies, 2010-present, DAAD Fellowship to Germany (Feb-Aug 2014)

 

last updated May 2014

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\klaus\Documents\Klaus - current\2 TEACHING\Students - current\Chris Massina\Suit2.jpg

 

Chris Massina, PhD Student

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Electrochromic Thermal Control Technology Development

Chris Massina received a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Iowa State University and a Bachelor's Degree in Applied Physics from the University of Northern Iowa. Chris completed his Master's Degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado - Boulder while working as a Graduate Research Assistant at BioServe Space Technologies. His research focuses on reducing the impact of extravehicular activity on spacecraft life support systems. His interests include extravehicular activity and life support system technology development.  

 

 

 

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies, 2011-2012; NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF), 2012-present

 

 

 

last updated July 2012

 

Gamsky bio_photo

Jake Gamsky, PhD Student

ECLSS Technology Development

Jake Gamsky received his B.S. in Physics from the University of Kentucky in May of 2011 after spending 2 ½ years at Georgetown College on a baseball scholarship. He received his M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado-Boulder in May of 2013 and is currently developing his PhD thesis topic.

As an undergraduate student, Jake worked as an intern at the Kennedy Space Center and as a research associate in the NASA Academy at Ames Research Center. He also held positions at the Kentucky Space Engineering Lab, Students for the Exploration and Development of Space and the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. After graduating from Kentucky, Jake spent the summer in Graz, Austria participating in the International Space University’s Space Studies Program. Jake is currently working on his PhD and interning at the Sierra Nevada Corporation in the design and development of the Dream Chaser spacecraft. With his PhD work, Jake hopes to advance an air revitalization technology for future use in long duration human spaceflight missions. In his spare time Jake enjoys traveling, sports, entrepreneurship, camping, snowboarding, SCUBA diving and exercising.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NSF Fellowship 2011-2014

last updated March 2014

 

KSC Launch Director Photo

 

Jordan Holquist, PhD Student

Spacecraft Thermal Control and Air Revitalization Technologies

Jordan Holquist received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in May of 2012. He is currently pursuing his M.S. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder). His present research consists of the characterization and modeling a self-regulating freezable heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal control. Jordan is also currently consulting on a project to develop an Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) technology test facility. He has an interest in atmosphere revitalization and has previously been involved in research at CU Boulder for a potassium superoxide-based passive life support system.

As an undergraduate at Illinois, Jordan was heavily involved in extracurricular activities. He worked to found and lead Illinois Robotics in Space, a student group that annually competes at NASA’s Lunabotics Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center. Jordan has also flown aboard a reduced gravity aircraft to conduct human-system integration tests with tablet computers in microgravity as part of NASA’s Microgravity University program. His senior design team won 1st place in an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) sponsored, nation-wide competition to design a crewed mission to Phobos. While at Illinois, Jordan also aided with research in active control of supersonic flows using plasma actuators, visualized with optical flow diagnostics.

He has held internships with the NASA Propulsion Academy at the Marshall Space Flight Center, at Oceaneering Space Systems, and at the Johnson Space Center. At CU Boulder, Jordan has served as the project manager and fluid system lead for a Remote Gardening System as part of NASA’s eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge. He was a member of a graduate student team that won 1st place and best advanced concept for a Bioregenerative Life Support System design at the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts - Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) competition in June 2013. In his spare time, Jordan is a musician; he also enjoys rock climbing, backpacking, skiing, and SCUBA diving.

PhD Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  NASA JSC CEP 2013; NASA STTR 2013-2014, NSTRF 2014-present

last updated May 2014

 

Tobias Niederwieser

 

Tobias Niederwieser, MS Student

 

Spacecraft Atmosphere Revitalization System Test and Development

Tobias Niederwieser earned a Bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from TU Munich, Germany in 2013. During his studies he worked as research assistant at the Institute of Astronautics, where he developed a sensor module for recording the atmospheric conditions within a spacecraft.

At CU Boulder, Tobias is in the Master’s program for aerospace engineering sciences and is specializing in Bioastronautics. In parallel, Tobias works as a research assistant at BioServe Space Technologies, where he is helping to develop a Middeck Locker-sized Life Support System for rodents. This allows the transports of rodents within unmanned resupply carriers to the ISS for scientific research.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  BioServe 2013-present

 

last updated March 2014

 

 

Heather Hava, PhD Student

Improving Habitability, Mood & Diet through Bioregenerative Food Systems

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. Nikolaus Correll, CU Computer Science Dept.

Research Funding: NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF), 2012-present

last updated September 2012

 

 

 

Prior Bioastronautics Research Students, Visitors & Project Teams (since 2002)

 

lifelab_spring2014

Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Test Bed Graduate Projects Team (Spring 2014)

The LifeLAB team is designing, building, and validating a modular test facility within the CU Bioastronautics Lab, which provides infrastructure to enable research on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies. With two vacuum chambers (RALPHEE and JANA), a water chiller loop and an air revitalization test rig (AETHER) the emphasis of the fall 2013/spring 2014 group is on the thermal and atmosphere testing with potential updates on waste management and water recovery next term.

 

Photo from left to right: Dr. James Nabity, Asa Darnell, Tobias Niederwieser, Jonathan Anthony, Roger Huang, Robert Griffin Hale, Elise Kowalski, Tyson Sparks, Karla Rosario, Katie Brissenden, Dr. David Klaus

 

Project advisors Professors Klaus and Nabity

Project Funding: William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

last updated May 2014

 

Griffin Hale

Griffin Hale

Mathematical Modeling of Microorganisms in Microgravity and ECLSS Technology Development

Robert (Griffin) Hale is currently pursuing his BS/MS in Aerospace Engineering with an emphasis in Bioastronautics and has completed a minor in Biochemistry at the University of Colorado. His applied math project focused on modeling the effects of flocculation on non-motile bacteria in microgravity. He volunteered for the outreach portion of the 2012 graduate winning NIA/NASA Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage  (RASC_AL) competition, where a lunar base mockup was built in his garage.  In 2013, he was a member of the Bioregenerative Life Support Systems, (BLSS) team. The BLSS team incorporated plants to supplement the life support capabilities in a detailed mission design to Mars. The team received the award for best graduate project as well as the award for best advanced concept in the 2013 RASC-AL competition. Griffin is currently the systems lead for the atmospheric portion of a graduate project team dedicated to designing, building, and validating an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) test facility at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

 

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

MS Aero May 2014

Post Graduation:  Sierra Nevada Corp.

 

last updated May 2014

 

Gonzalez - Copy

 

Stefanie Gonzalez, MS Student

Disuse osteopenia

Stefanie Gonzalez graduated with a Master of Science (MS) in Aerospace Engineering Sciences and is now working on the Thermal Protection System of the Orion Spacecraft with Analytical Mechanics and Associates (AMA). She earned her undergraduate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) in 2011. While pursuing her MS degree Stefanie focused her research on evaluating the role of phosphate dysregulation on disuse osteopenia to provide fundamental mechanistic knowledge that would enable future studies more appropriate for studying clinical and translational research. Additionally, Stefanie participated in the Caltech Space Challenge, an intensive 5-day mission design competition and was a member of the MIT/Skoltech Space Exploration Strategy Research Group. She also contributed to the design of the Sierra Nevada Corp. (SNC) Dream Chaser spacecraft through the graduate projects program at CU. Prior to the University of Colorado, Boulder, Stefanie participated in two internships at NASA Johnson Space center in the Space Life Sciences Department. She also spent a summer patterning fibroblast cells on microstructures at Johns Hopkins University (JHU), Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. During the final two years of pursuing her B.S., Stefanie worked at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Neurosurgery. Research that Stefanie conducted was presented at a platform session at the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research (ASGSR), Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS), Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) conference, Great Lakes Biomedical Engineering Conference, and at the Lumbar Spine Annual Meeting. Stefanie enjoys traveling the world, has backpacked through Scandinavia and southern Europe, has run several marathons, is scuba diving certified and is currently training for an ultra-marathon.

 

Advisors: Dr. Louis Stodieck and Dr. Virginia Ferguson

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies, 2012, NSF Fellowship 2013-2014

MS Aero May 2014

Post Graduation:  Analytical Mechanics and Associates

last updated May 2014

Geoff2

 

Geoffrey King, MS Student

 

Mechanical and Thermal Design of the Space Automated Bio Lab for ISS

Geoffrey King earned a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration in Aeronautical Engineering from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, in 2010. During his degree, Geoff completed several internships including one summer at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and another at the McGill Aerospace Mechatronics Laboratory. At CSA, Geoff implemented a microgravity drop tower to educate teachers about microgravity; Geoff also prepared a fluid configuration experiment to fly in microgravity on CSA's parabolic flight aircraft. Between undergrad and grad school, Geoff worked abroad as an Application Engineer for SolidWorks in Australia.

At CU Boulder, Geoff studies Aerospace Engineering and is specializing in Bioastronautics. Geoff works as a research assistant at BioServe Space Technologies, where he is continuing development of the Space Automated Bio Lab (SABL), a next-generation biological incubator to replace BioServe's Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA). Geoff is working on the mechanical/thermal design and systems engineering for SABL, which uses thermoelectric modules to heat and cool a science volume containing biological experiments such as cell cultures.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  BioServe 2012-2014

MS Aero May 2014

 

last updated may 2014

 

IMG_1629 - Copy

 

 

Stuart Tozer, MS Student

Spacecraft Atmosphere Revitalization System Test and Development

Stuart Tozer received his Bachelor of Biomedical and Electrical Engineering degree from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, in 2011. While at Carleton, he spent co-operative work terms at the Communications Research Centre Canada and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). At the CSA, Stuart worked with the Operational Space Medicine group to develop medical procedures and technologies for Moon and Mars analogue site projects, including integration of commercial off-the-shelf telemedicine equipment. Stuart also spent a summer term working with the Medical Information-Technology Research Group at Carleton, where his research focused on computer interfaces of a clinical decision-support system for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. At Carleton, Stuart's senior engineering design project used memristors (resistors with hysteresis properties) to model synaptic plasticity in neurons, which forms the basis of pattern recognition in the visual system. This work earned his project group the IEEE Canada Student Paper Competition Life Member Award and was published in the IEEE Canadian Review Spring 2012 edition.

Stuart obtained his Master's degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences, focusing on Bioastronautics, and a Master's degree in Engineering Management at the University of Colorado Boulder. His graduate project work has been on the Hybrid Sounding Rocket (HySoR) program and he served as Project Manager for the Fall 2012 semester. Additionally, Stuart was a member of the CU Boulder Extraterrestrial Outpost (ExO) project group that was awarded 1st-Place at the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts - Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) design competition in June 2012.  In the summer of 2012, Stuart worked on a CO2 removal testbed project for Lockheed Martin, which included a feasibility study of the sensor technologies required to measure CO2 filter performance. Stuart's current research at BioServe Space Technologies is an atmospheric regeneration system (pressurized oxygen, CO2 and humidity removal) being developed for the SpaceX Dragon and Orbital Cygnus cargo spacecraft in order to support transport of live rodents to the ISS.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: Lockheed Martin, summer 2012; BioServe Space Technologies, 2012-2014

MS Aero May 2014

last updated May  2014

 

miyajima-pic

 

Professor Hiroyuki Miyajima

Visiting Professor (Fall 2013)

Hiroyuki Miyajima is a professor at Tokyo Jogakkan College. He conducted research on space habitation and space craft design as a visiting professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences during the fall semester of 2013.

He majored in aeronautics at Nihon University in Tokyo and has been doing research on space habitation design for over twenty years. One of his primary works concerns life support material circulation analysis and design to support habitation experiments for the Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF), used in Japan’s Biosphere. He received a Ph.D. in this field in 2005.

He participated on Crew 132 at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) as an engineer and on Crew 137 as the commander of Team Nippon (Japan) in the 2013-2014 field season (see photo). He is currently engaged in research about logistics and life support systems analysis for high-mobility exploration. He is interested in space habitation technology, logistics and excursions using vehicles on planetary surfaces.

 

 

last updated January 2014

 

IMG_20131218_151427_787 - Copy

 

Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Test Bed Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2013)

Beginning in the Fall of 2013, the LifeLAB team began developing an ECLSS test bed facility for use by CU students and faculty interested in developing technology to support life in space. The facility will eventually consist of four major test rigs: atmosphere, water, waste, and thermal.

The focus for the 2013/2014 academic year is to design and build the atmosphere and thermal test systems, and to begin the validation process for both of these rigs. The thermal system consists of a small, bell-jar thermal vacuum chamber (donated by Sierra Nevada Corp.), a cylindrical thermal vacuum chamber (being designed and fabricated by the LifeLAB team), and a water/glycol chiller loop (being utilized by a separate NASA-funded research project). The atmosphere rig will provide controlled input streams of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, trace gasses, and humidity at a range of concentrations. Validation testing is anticipated to begin in April 2014.

 

With project advisors Professors Klaus and Nabity

Project Funding: William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

last updated December 2013

 

DC_Student_Group_045PC - small

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2013)

The fall 2013 project focused on the development of a high-fidelity cockpit console for use in a vertical mockup and assessment of pilot seats and controls in tandem with cockpit egress human factor evaluations. The cockpit was subjected to test loads of 1200 lbf to simulate expected loads on the structure that would be generated by fully suited crewmembers during ingress/egress operations. The human factor evaluations included analysis of anthropometric data ensure the design could accommodate a range of crewmembers from 5th percentile Japanese female to 95th percentile American male.  In addition to use of test subjects, the team also developed a human model for CAD analysis.

 

 

With project advisor Jim Voss

Project Funding: Sierra Nevada Corporation

last updated December 2013

 

XHab team at KSC

X-Hab Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2012 / Spring 2013)

At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, students from University of Colorado are working with NASA mentors in developing a robotic capability for growing a variety of plants, both for consumption as well as the benefit of oxygen-carbon dioxide cycling. Considerations range from monitoring and nutrient supply to selection of plants and autonomy. The activity is part of the eXploration Habitat, or X-Hab, Academic Innovation Challenge. Standing, left to right, are Gioia Massa of the NASA ISS Ground Processing and Research Project Office, Daniel Zukowski, Morgan Simpson of the NASA Ground Processing Directorate, Heather Hava, Keira Havens, Matthew Carton, Christine Fanchiang, Jordan Holquist and Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. Kneeling, left to right, are Ray Wheeler of the NASA Engineering and Technology Directorate, Tracy Gill of the NASA Center Planning and Development Directorate, Scott Mishra and Robert Griffin Hale. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann (Not pictured from the CU X-Hab team are Karuna Raja Reddy, Rohit Dewani, Pileun Kim, Tim Villabona, Emily Howard, and Huy Le) 

Supported by http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/   KSC-2013-2867 (06/21/2013) 

Project news and photos:  http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012/may/HQ_12-166_X_Hab_Selectees.html

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=65900      http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=65882  

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=65881      http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=65880 

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=65879    

Project Advisors:  Joe Tanner and Nikolaus Correll

last updated June 2013

 

103_6054 - Copy

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Spring 2013)

For Spring 2013, the team was tasked with providing preliminary design recommendations for cockpit and seating to SNC, including structural load and human interface analyses. The cockpit design team modified the engineering design unit (EDU) to provide a realistic representation of the Dream Chaser interior. The work included; reconstruction of the mounting structure and panels to incorporate the previous semester’s recommendations; installed space rated switches, display screens, hand controls; added ELCSS volumetric insert; mounted ring frame mockups and integrated new seats into the cockpit. The seating team completed designs for a rigid traditional pilot seat with a cloth seat for non-flight crew members to minimize mass and volume. The work included an in-depth structural analysis on both designs; seat fabrication; installation of fore/aft and up/down actuation for the pilot seat; test structure development and load testing; and ingress/egress evaluations.

Pictured left to right, standing: Joe Tanner, Jeffrey Oxenbury, Mark Robinson, Brandon Wilk, Matthew Lawry, Daniel Green and Jim Voss; front row: Emily Logan, Ashley Williams, Ashley Gleaves, and Stefanie Gonzalez

Project Advisors:  Ken Stroud (not pictured), Joe Tanner and Jim Voss

Project Funding: Sierra Nevada Corporation

last updated May 2013

 

Bioastro Group Fall 2012 - Copy

 

Bioastronautics Research Group (Fall 2012)

This group photo includes graduate students participating in research areas ranging from the development of biomedical countermeasures against bone and muscle atrophy experienced by astronauts, to how reduced gravity affects microorganism behavior, to the design of space suit and life support system technologies and spacecraft habitats, and dynamic thermal modeling of systems on the lunar surface.

 

The students are supported by a number of contracts and grants from government and private industry including the FAA, Sierra Nevada Corporation, NASA NSTRF, NASA STTR, German DAAD, the William F. Marlar Memorial Trust and BioServe Space Technologies.

 

2012 marks the 10th year of establishing a formalized Bioastronautics program at CU and the 25th anniversary of the founding of BioServe Space Technologies.

 

last updated December 2012

 

Josh with SRHX at TDA

 

Joshua Hecht

Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Water-Based Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger

Joshua Hecht received his BS in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder and is currently pursuing his MS with an emphasis in Bioastronautics.  His research focuses on modeling, testing, and implementation analysis of a self-regulating freezable heat exchanger intended for use within a human-rated spacecraft.  His other academic interests include Spanish, psychology, and physiology.  Joshua worked as a satellite operator for four years at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and spent half a year in satellite design with Broadreach Engineering.  Outside of school, Joshua enjoys mid distance running, rock climbing, skydiving, yoga, home brewing beer, and spending time with family.

 

 

MS Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA STTR with TDA Research, Inc., 2012

MS Aero December 2012

Post Graduation:  Paragon Space Development Corp.

last updated January 2014

 

IMG_4359 - Copy

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2012)

Project Focus:  Spacecraft cockpit Displays and Controls and Seat Design

 

 

Project Advisors:  Ken Stroud and Merri Sanchez from SNC, and former NASA Astronauts Jim Voss and Joe Tanner

Project Funding: Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

 

 

 

 

last updated December 2012

 

PhilippHager

 

Philipp Hager, PhD Student (TUM)

Dynamic thermal modeling for moving objects on atmosphere-less celestial bodies

Philipp studied at the Technische Universität Karlsruhe (now KIT- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) where he received his pre-diploma in mechanical engineering in 2005. He received a Diploma (MS thesis: Development of a dynamic human water balance model for verification and optimization of life support systems in space flight applications) in Aerospace Engineering in 2008 from the Technische Universität München (TUM). His main focus and interest is exploration of the solar system. He participated in an internship at Thales Alenia Space, SPA in Turin, Italy in 2007, working in the ESA Aurora program. In 2008 he participated in the ESA Alpbach Summer School, designing a mission to an M-type asteroid. In his master thesis he developed a simulation of the human water and electrolyte balance system in conjunction with ECLSS simulations. In 2009 he joined the LRT as a research assistant and, amongst other projects, has since been working on the thermal and dust environment on the lunar surface and its impact on spacecraft. Philipp likes to travel, see and explore not only the solar system but also different parts of the world. In his free time Philipp likes to run, hike, snowboard, do Aikido, soccer, and play guitar. His Ph.D. work on the thermal modeling for moving objects on atmosphere-less celestial bodies is connected to electronically controlled electrochromic radiators, which are under investigation at the CU bioastronautics group for their application with spacesuits.

Practicum Supervisor:  Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding (while at CU Fall 2012): German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

PhD Adviser: Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Ulrich Walter, Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universität München (TUM)

PhD TUM, 2013

last updated August  2013

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\klaus\Documents\Klaus - current\1 RESEARCH\Projects & Proposals\NASA Reduced-G Convect 2011-12\Micro-g team.jpg

 

Microgravity Convective Heat Transfer Flight Research (Summer 2012)

A group of six CU undergraduate students were selected to participate in NASA’s 2012 Reduced-Gravity Education Flight Program to conduct their experiment titled ‘Validating the Gravity Dependence of the Churchill-Chu Correlation for Free Convective Heat Transfer from a Finite, Flat Plate:  A Study of the Effects of Gravity on Free Convective Heat Transfer during Parabolic Flights’

Team Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Funding: William F. Marlar Memorial Trust, UCEC, CU Aerospace Department, CU Dean’s Office

 

See video summary of the flight - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSnrFg_j_vI

 

last updated August 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jenny

 

Jennifer Mindock, PhD

 

Development and Application of Spaceflight Performance Shaping Factors for Human Reliability Analysis

Jennifer Mindock is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, within the Department’s Bioastronautics focus area.  She holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Florida and an M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University.  Jennifer began her doctoral studies in January of 2009.  Her thesis plans involve developing a function-based, Probabilistic Risk Assessment methodology for characterizing spacecraft conceptual design trade space. The research is based on analysis of system-level risk factors to define mitigation design strategies. Until December 2008, her primary industry experience was as a Senior System Engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).  In her 8 years with JPL, she led teams spanning multiple NASA centers and various disciplines on projects ranging from high-level customer requirements and capability definition to low-level, detailed hardware testing and vehicle performance analysis. In these roles, she contributed to projects including the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) evaluating various sensors and algorithms for landing humans and equipment on the moon, the Mars Phoenix Lander, the Mars Exploration Rovers, and the Space Interferometry Mission.  Jennifer is now extending her professional career toward human space flight applications.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2009-present, ARCS Scholar, Zonta Amelia Earhart Fellowship

Additional Info:  NASA Astronaut Candidate Finalist, 2009

PhD Aero August 2012

Post Graduation: Wyle, NASA JSC

last updated July 2012

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\klaus\Documents\Klaus - current\2 TEACHING\Courses Spr 2012\DC Team Spring 2012 - Copy.JPG

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Spring 2012)

Project Focus:  Spacecraft cockpit Displays and Controls design and layout

 

Team photo with SNC advisor Jim Voss

Project Advisors:  Ken Stroud, Merri Sanchez, and NASA Astronauts Jim Voss (far right), Joe Tanner and Steve Lindsey

Project Funding: Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

last updated June 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Sarah

 

Sarah Over

 

Spacecraft Cockpit Design and Human-Vehicle Interactions

Sarah Over completed her undergraduate studies in Aerospace Engineering from Virginia Tech and is currently pursuing her M.S. in Aerospace Engineering with a Bioastronautics emphasis at CU Boulder.  Her research focuses on cockpit development for air and space vehicles, defining research needs driven by vehicle design and human-vehicle interaction.  She also has research interests in aerospace medicine, specifically human factors, accident prevention, and radiation effects and mitigation.  She has held internships with NASA Glenn Research Center focusing on digital modeling of human physiology and applying sun sensors to manned lunar exploration.  Sarah's goal is to continue her studies working toward a professional career in academia, teaching and conducting research in aerospace medicine.

 

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: William F. Marlar Memorial Trust Summer 2011, AAUW Selected Professions Fellowship 2011/12

MS Aero May 2012

Post Graduation: PhD program at Texas A&M, Nuclear Engineering, Space Life Sciences empahsis

last updated June 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Kevin

 

Kevin Higdon, PhD

A Systematic Process for Assessing Human Spacecraft Designs in Terms of Relative Safety and Operational Characteristics

Kevin received his Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Auburn University (1996) and his Master’s of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (2005).  His graduate-level research involved the development of a numerical analysis program for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center which predicted the thrust and side loads of differentially throttled liquid plug nozzle engines in a very quick timeframe when compared to conventional CFD programs.  While pursuing his Master’s degree, he also supported the US Army’s Theater High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) program as a Propulsion Systems Engineer.  He developed and continues to support the Boost Motor Analysis Program (BMAP) which is used by the US Army for reduction of solid rocket motor flight test data from White Sands Missile Range.  Although his graduate research and work experience has been in the field of missile and space propulsion, his primary focus at CU is in human spacecraft design.  Kevin is currently completing his PhD thesis research combining various applications of systems engineering, computational modeling and human factors analysis for conceptual human spacecraft design.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2006/07, William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

PhD Aero May 2012

Post Graduation: Sierra Nevada Corporation

last updated June 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: IMG_0529 - web

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2011)

Project Focus:  To develop a cockpit design architecture focusing on displays, controls, and layout for the SNC Dream Chaser space system based on advances in cockpit technology balanced with NASA heritage systems.  The Fall 2011 semester produced an improved architecture and a functional cockpit mockup, which included a computer system that allowed for control of up to six electronic displays in the cockpit by the operator.  This facility was then used for conducting a second round of human factors evaluations.

Students, from left to right:  Jason Carpenter, Brian Curtis, Dan Anderson, Luis Zea, Ian Aber, Jenae Lestishen, Becca Mitchell, Sarah Over, Heather Hava, Brian Roth, Matt Ducheck, Chris Massina.

Project Advisors:  Merri Sanchez (left), and NASA Astronauts Jim Voss (right), Joe Tanner (back row) and Steve Lindsey (center)

 

Project Funding:  William F. Marlar Memorial Trust and Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

 

last updated December 2011

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: cid:B4304024-5035-4434-9D07-21FD266EB68D@Belkin

Jonas Schnaitmann

 

Verification and enhancement of an environmentally sensitive human physiological model

Jonas Schnaitmann is studying aerospace engineering at the Technical University in Munich (TUM). He worked on his diploma (Master’s) thesis at CU in Boulder during the fall 2011 term, where he further integrated the different sub-models of a human physiological model used within a life support system simulation project called "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB) at TUM, and subsequently verified and further enhanced the model. His overall interest lies in life support system simulations with focus on the human physiology, physical/chemical subsystems and control strategies. In 2010, he spent four months in Japan as an intern at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in Tokyo, working on the modeling and simulation of air revitalization systems, particularly a two bed molecular sieve.

Practicum Supervisor:  Dr. David Klaus

MS Advisor: Dr. Ulrich Walter

Research Funding: German Fellowship

Dipl Ing Aerospace, TUM 2012

PhD Student, TUM

 

last updated June 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DC Team 2011 Spr

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Spring 2011)

Project Focus:  To develop a cockpit design architecture focusing on displays, controls, and layout for the SNC Dream Chaser space system based on advances in cockpit technology balanced with NASA heritage systems.  The Spring 2011 semester produced the baseline cockpit architecture and a form/fit cockpit mockup that was utilized for a first round of human factors evaluations.

Students from left to right: Jason Carpenter, Dustin Martin, Dan Anderson, Heather Hava, Matt Ducheck, Luis Zea, Sarah Over, Chris Massina, Drew Gottula, Weston Edwards

Project Advisors:  Jim Voss (far left), Joe Tanner (not pictured), Merri Sanchez and Prof Klaus (far right)

 

Project Funding:  William F. Marlar Memorial Trust and Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

last updated May 2011

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Ben

 

Ben Kemper

Human Spacecraft Safety and Operability

Ben received his Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado and his commission into the Air Force in 2010. While waiting to go to pilot training, he completed initial coursework for his Master’s of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering also at the University of Colorado and plans to continue through CAETE.  Ben's graduate research revolved around different facets of the Dream Chaser human spacecraft beginning with the development of a software tool to determine and evaluate the placement of components internal to the vehicle's pressurized volume.  In 2010, he was part of a research team to develop a human rating plan for the Dream Chaser and the systems engineer on a separate effort to design a cockpit architecture for the vehicle.  As an undergraduate, Ben was a project manager or a team lead for half a dozen diverse student projects and spent 2 summers interning for Lockheed Martin.  Ben's goal is to attend test pilot school and extend his professional career toward human space flight applications after retiring from the Air Force.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: Sierra Nevada Corp, under NASA CCDev Contract

BS Aero December 2010

Post Graduation: US Air Force

last updated December 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Chad

 

Chad Healy

Human Spacecraft Safety and Operability

Chad Healy is an Ensign in the United States Navy working towards his Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His studies are focused in the field of Bioastronautics, revolving around the development and design of Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Dream Chaser Spacecraft. He helped to draft a Human Rating Plan for the vehicle, and was project manager for a team designing its displays and controls layout.  In addition, Chad has worked on developing a methodology for evaluating internal configurations of human-rated spacecraft, specifically tailored to the Dream Chaser, and was a Research Assistant for BioServe Space Technologies.  Prior to his time in Boulder, Chad graduated from the United States Naval Academy (USNA) in May 2009 with a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering.  He conducted research as the lead systems engineer and attitude control systems engineer for three CubeSat missions in various stages of development. Chad also worked on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna at Goddard Space Flight Center, where he developed lock acquisition algorithms for laser stabilization cavities. After receiving his MS degree from CU, Chad returned to the fleet to begin training as a Navy pilot.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies; Sierra Nevada Corp, under NASA CCDev Contract

MS Aero December 2010

Post Graduation: US Navy

 

last updated December 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jonathan

 

Jonathan Metts, PhD

 

Assessing Feasibility of Electrochromic Space Suit Radiators for Reducing Extravehicular Activity Water Consumption

Jonathan received his B.S. (2004) and M.S. (2006) in Aerospace Engineering from Auburn University.  During this time, he managed a team of undergraduate students in a research project funded by Transformational Space Corporation (t/Space), in which students designed, prototyped, and tested a flexible, lightweight spacecraft seat.  He also studied the Russian language at Auburn University and received a scholarship to study the language and culture in St. Petersburg, Russia in the summer of 2003.  Jonathan's M.S. research background is in optimization of missile systems via genetic algorithms, but returned to his primary interest, human space flight, upon entering the PhD program at CU-Boulder.  His thesis topic defines and evaluates the application of variable-emissivity materials for a flexible, integrated radiator-based thermal control system in space suits. During his time at CU, Jonathan also helped build the Lunar Lander mock-up and was part of a team developing a human-rating plan for the Dream Chaser commercial space vehicle. He served as a Research Assistant for BioServe, a Teaching Assistant for ASEN 2004, Lead Graduate Teacher for the AES department, and on judication panels for the CU Honor Code. Jonathan graduated with his PhD in December 2010 and plans to continue research on human spaceflight in government or industry, with an eventual return to academia later in his career.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2007-2010; ARCS Scholar, 2008; Conference Travel by the William F. Marlar Memorial Trust; 2010, Sierra Nevada Corp, under NASA CCDev Contract, 2010

PhD Aero December 2010

Post Graduation: Sierra Nevada Corporation

last updated June 2011

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DC Team 2010 Fall

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2010)

Project Focus:  The emphasis for this semester was narrowed down to spacecraft cockpit design and ergonomics evaluation.  A rapid engineering prototype was configured based on definition of functional requirements and was used to conduct initial field-of-view and reach envelope evaluations from both the left and right seats.

 

Team photo with SNC and CU project advisors.

 

Project Advisors:  Merri Sanchez (left), Jim Voss (center) and Joe Tanner (front)

Project Funding:  William F. Marlar Memorial Trust and Sierra Nevada Corporation

 

last updated December 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Ryan

 

 

Ryan Kobrick, PhD

Characterization and Measurement Standardization of Lunar Dust Abrasion for Spacecraft Design and Operations

Dr. Ryan L. Kobrick received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario (2002), his Master's of Space Studies degree from the International Space University in Strasbourg, France (2003), his Master's of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering from The Pennsylvania State University (2005) in University Park, PA, and his PhD in Aerospace Engineering Sciences (focus: Bioastronautics) from the University of Colorado at Boulder in Boulder, CO. 

He worked with the X PRIZE Foundation (2003, 2004 & 2006) developing the follow-on event to the $10 million ANSARI X PRIZE called the X PRIZE Cup. Ryan participated as a crewmember in The Mars Society's Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) four times of crews 25 (2004), 44 / ExBeta (2006), 56 / ExGamma (2007) and 58 / FMARS Training (2007). From his MDRS experiences, he was selected for a 100-day Mars mission simulation in the High Canadian Arctic on Devon Island, Nunavut at the Mars Society's Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS). On the FMARS Crew 11 Long Duration Mission (F-XI LDM), he facilitated the Human Factors studies for the crew of 7 as well as being a crew engineer. His CU-Boulder start was in the summer of 2005 researching space suit portable life support systems with Dr. Klaus on a NASA-funded project.

Ryan was awarded a 2007 NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP) award. He was the recipient of the 2006 AIAA Orville and Wilbur Wright Graduate Award, a three-time Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Scholar 2006-2009, and was the Department’s 2009 John A. Vise Memorial Scholarship recipient. Ryan participated in space outreach as an alumni of the Advisory Committee for the CU-Boulder chapter of the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (CUSEDS), and as an advisor for both SEDS Canada and Mars Society Canada's Exploration Mars (ExMars) Program. In July 2010, Ryan was named Executive Director of Yuri's Night.

Homepage: www.RyInSpace.com

PhD Thesis Advisor / Committee Chair: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA CRAVE DO1 (2005); BioServe Space Technologies; AIAA Orville and Wilbur Wright Graduate Award (2006); ARCS Scholar (2006), CU EEF Grant (2007), NASA GSRP Fellowship (2007-2010), Conference Travel by the William F. Marlar Memorial Trust, 2010

PhD Aero August 2010

Post Graduation: Postdoc at MIT, 2010

last updated December 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DC Team 2010 Spr

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Spring 2010)


Project Focus:  Definition and development of a volumetric mockup for layout analysis correlated to a mass and CG computational model.

 

 

Louisville Company Supports CU Aerospace Students and Faculty in Dream Chaser Development

Astronauts Trade in Spaceflight for Student Contact

 

 

Project Advisors:  Jim Voss and Joe Tanner

Project Funding:  William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

 

last updated June 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DC team 2009 Fall

 

Dream Chaser Graduate Projects Team (Fall 2009)

Project Focus:  Habitable volume layout definition with mass and CG computational model.

 

Astronaut Jim Voss Joins CU-Boulder Aerospace Faculty

 

Project Advisors:  Jim Voss and Joe Tanner

Project Funding:  William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

 

 

 

last updated December 2009

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Evan

 

Evan Thomas, PhD

 

Sustainable Fouling Management for Spacecraft Fluid Handling Systems

Evan completed his BS/MS Aerospace Engineering at CU-Boulder in May 2006. As a cooperative education employee at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Evan worked in the Life Support and Habitability Systems Branch in the Crew and Thermal Systems Division. His MS research at CU and at NASA was in Microgravity Fire Detection, analyzing the feasibility of a Modulated Laser Analyzer for Combustion Products (MLA-CP) for the crewed spacecraft environment. Evan was also Editor-in-Chief of the Colorado Engineer Magazine, and is involved with Engineers Without Borders (EWB), leading sustainable development projects in Rwanda and Nepal.  Evan founded the EWB-JSC chapter with other NASA engineers in 2004. Evan has received multiple awards from NASA and EWB for engineering development.

 

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA JSC Fellowship, CU EEF

PhD Aero Aug 2009

Post Graduation: NASA Civil Servant, Johnson Space Center, Crew and Thermal Systems 2004-10; Assistant Professor, Portland State University, 2010

 

 last updated September 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Brock

 

Brock Kowalchuk

 

Prototyping the Next Generation Lunar Lander Vehicle Habitat (Spring 2009)

Brock is currently pursuing a BS in Aerospace Engineering and a certificate in Engineering Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado at Boulder, expecting to graduate in May 2011. He was involved with prototyping the Lunar Ascent Module during his sophomore year in the program. His work included developing volumetric and CAD models of subsystem hardware components for a proposed “Minimum Functionality” Lunar Ascent Module design.  Currently, he works as a Command Controller at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), operating several spacecraft, including Kepler. After completing his BS, Brock is planning to pursue an advanced engineering degree in either Aerospace or Mechanical Engineering. His interests include entrepreneurship and learning how people can better interface with technology.

 

Project Supervisor: Dr. David Klaus and Kevin Higdon (PhD student)

Funding: Dean’s Discovery Learning Apprentice 2008/09 and the William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

BS Aero May 2011

 

last updated June 2011

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Andrea H

 

Andrea Hanson, PhD

 

Tissue Engineering to Assess Bone and Muscle Atrophy and Radiation Exposure During Space Flight

Andrea received a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of North Dakota in 2002.  Her interests lie in the area of assessing bone and muscle atrophy during long duration space flight and looking at the effects of radiation exposure during space flight.  She has worked with BioServe Space Technologies for the past year looking at protein inhibitors that may help atrophying muscles and has worked on an osteoprotegrin bone study.  She is also working with cell cultures to study the effects of radiation on mammalian cells.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. Virginia Ferguson (CU Mech Eng)

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies

PhD Aero Dec 2008

Post Graduation: Postdoc at University of Washington, 2009

 

 

last updated December 2008

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Bioastro Group 2008 Fall

 

Bioastronautics Research Group (Fall 2008)

This group photo represents student and faculty researchers with interests ranging from the development of biomedical countermeasures against bone and muscle atrophy experienced by astronauts to design of space suit and spacecraft habitats, spanning the study and support of life in space.  The team is supported by a wide range of contracts and grants from NASA and private industry.

BioServe Space Technologies, a Research Center housed in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department since 1987, largely anchors this program.

NASA Astronaut Joe Tanner (back center),who recently joined our faculty, brings a wealth of firsthand experience to the Bioastronautics Program with four shuttle flights and seven space walks to his credit.  He is now helping to educate the next generation of space engineers.

 

 

 

last updated December 2008

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Ralf

 

Ralf Purschke

 

Human anthropometric modeling for spacecraft design

Ralf received his Diploma / MS in Aerospace Engineering from the Technische Universität München (TUM) in the Human Spaceflight Research Group. He is interested in Human Spaceflight and Satellite Design. For his MS he studied neutral body posture of astronauts in weightlessness and developed a model for predicting body posture in space. He conducted his Practicum as an International Exchange student at CU from fall 2008 through spring 2009, before returning to the TUM Institute of Astronautics under Prof. Walter. There he is working on a project which is funded by the German Space Administration in the field of Space Mechanism Design.

Practicum Supervisor:  Dr. David Klaus

MS Advisor: Dr. Ulrich Walter

Research Funding: German Fellowship

MS Aerospace, TUM 2009

Post Graduation: PhD Student, TUM

 

last updated September 2010

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Kennda

 

Kennda Lynch

Quantitative Habitability Assessment of Planetary Environments

Kennda’s research interests involve elucidating environments on a planetary surface that are most likely to be habitable through an integrated predication technology that is aimed at detecting biosignatures in the local environment. This work will have the most immediate impact on future Martian in-situ investigations; however this system can be utilized in mission platforms for other astrobiology targets such as Europa, Enceladus and Titan as well.  Kennda completed her MS degree from CU in the Spring of 2008 and is now continuing toward a PhD at the Colorado School of Mines.

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Recipient of a 2008 NASA Harriet Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship

MS Aero May 2008

Post Graduation: PhD Student, CSM   

last updated 8/22/08

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Matthias

 

Matthias Pfeiffer

Human metabolic model for integrated ECLSS robustness analysis

Matthias received his Diplom/MS in Aerospace Engineering from Technische Universität München (TUM) in the Human Spaceflight Research Group. His interests lie in the field of human spaceflight and In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). For his MS thesis he developed a simulation of human metabolism for an integrated evaluation of ECLSS robustness. He conducted his Practicum as an International Exchange student at CU during the fall of 2007 and spring 2008, before returning to the TUM Institute of Astronautics under Prof. Walter. There Matthias worked on the design and development of a compact antenna pointing mechanism for small satellite. He was later offered the opportunity to conduct research for future lunar ISRU technologies and is currently funded by a German Space Administration grant to investigate possible extraction of solar wind implanted particles on the moon.

Practicum Supervisor:  Dr. David Klaus

MS Advisor: Dr. Ulrich Walter 

Research Funding: German Fellowship

MS Aerospace, TUM, 2008

Post Graduation: PhD Student, TUM

last updated September 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jan

 

Jan Harder

Human respiratory system model to support the design of a space habitat

Jan received his Diploma / MS in Aerospace Engineering from the Technische Universität München (TUM) in the Human Spaceflight Research Group. He is interested in Human Spaceflight and Satellite Design. For his MS thesis, he developed a simulation for the human respiratory system for an integrated evaluation of ECLSS robustness.  He conducted his Practicum as an International Exchange student at CU from fall 2007 through spring 2008, before returning to the TUM Institute of Astronautics under Prof. Walter. Together with Matthias Pfeiffer and Ralf Purschke he worked on a technology development project for small satellite antenna systems for Real-Time Teleoperation in Space. Jan is also engaged in the CubeSat project MOVE which is the first Nano-Satellite of TUM.

Practicum Supervisor:  Dr. David Klaus

MS Advisor: Dr. Ulrich Walter

Research Funding: German Fellowship

MS Aerospace, TUM, 2008

Post Graduation: PhD Student, TUM

last updated November 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: LL Team 2007

Lunar Habitat Design Team (Spring and Fall 2007)

This pilot MS Project course, first offered in the Spring of 2007, was aimed at the following design goals and objectives: 1) analyze anticipated crew tasks (internal and extravehicular activities) to define operational requirements for the lunar surface sortie missions, 2) construct a rapidly-reconfigurable, full-scale prototype of the Lunar Habitat to assess vehicle configuration trade spaces, 3) conduct a computational mass analysis (CAD model of structure and subsystems) coupled to the mockup dimensions aimed at minimizing ascent stage mass, and 4) host local K-12 and public outreach events showcasing the ‘life size’ spacecraft mockup, complete with spacesuit demonstrations.  Ten students participated in the inaugural project, 7 of whom took jobs working on the development of NASA’s new Crew Exploration Vehicle, Orion, and next generation spacesuit for lunar exploration.

Project Webpage: http://www.colorado.edu/LunarMARS/ 

Project Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus (left)

Project Funding:  CU Engineering Excellence Fund and the William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

last updated 11/2/07

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Farres

 

Farres Ahmed

 

Assessing the Role of Gravity on Biological-Physical Interface Phenomena Governing Bacterial Growth

Farres’ research as an undergraduate at the University of Colorado at Boulder in MCD Biology focused on the temperature dependent growth and sedimentation characteristics of E. coli. In the future, he hopes to use this research to help better define E. coli growth patterns in simulated microgravity.

Research Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus

Project Funding: SURE, 2004; BURST, 2005/06, UROP Summer 2006

BS MCD Biology May 2007

Post Graduation: Medical School, CU Health Sciences

 

 

last updated 8/22/08

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Dan

 

Dan Baca

 

Lunar Surface Access Module: Design Analysis and Mockup Development (Fall 2006)

Dan completed his BA in Physics and Astronomy at the University of Montana, Missoula in May 2003.  He simultaneously completed another BA in Mathematics with a minor in Computer Science.  He continued working in his management position for CRS Hardware Corporation until he enrolled in the Aerospace Engineering Master's program at the University of Colorado in 2005.  As a Research Assistant in the NASA Academy, Dan worked in the optics branch of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center on modeling the far field phase patterns of the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.  He is currently serving as Vice President for the CU chapter of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (CUSEDS).  Dan is also with working Dr. Klaus on a new project involving the construction and analysis of a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) prototype.  This will help better define the requirements of the future spacecraft and create a laboratory component for the graduate Bioastronautics courses offered at CU.

 

MS Aero May 2007

 

Funding: William F. Marlar Memorial Trust

 

Post Graduation: Lockheed Martin

last updated 5/30/07

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Anna

Anna Stanczyk

 

Evaluating the Effects of Antibiotics on Bacterial Motility

Anna is an undergraduate student at the University of Michigan campus in Flint who spent the summer of 2006 at CU Boulder as a research intern.  She is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry, with a concentration in Biochemistry through the Honors Scholar Program at U of M Flint.  Her research is focusing on validating a protocol for assessing E. coli motility, as well as testing motility in the presence of antibiotics to attempt to resolve data that conflicts with the hypothesized model of how microorganisms respond to a microgravity environment.  In the future, Anna will use this research as the basis of her Senior Honors Thesis, and she is continuing the motility studies at her home campus.

Research and Honors Thesis Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus

Project Funding: University of Michigan-Flint Honors Scholar Program

 

last updated 9/6/06

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Vanessa

 

Vanessa Aponte, PhD

 

MEMS Biosensor Technology for Monitoring Astronaut Immune Response

Vanessa obtained her BS and MS Degrees in Chemical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (12/96 & 6/00). As an undergraduate she participated in a variety of research projects ranging from analysis of chemical engineering processes using computer modeling at Carnegie Mellon University to studying electrophoretic aggregation of latex particles as an intern at the University of Colorado at Boulder.  She first had the opportunity to work with the space program through her graduate studies, as her research was sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center in the area of Advanced Life Support. She has obtained multiple research awards, published her work and is affiliated with several professional organizations including AIAA, AIChE, Tau Beta Pi and NSS.  Her academic and research achievements allowed her to obtain a GEM fellowship sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to begin pursuing doctoral studies in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at CU. Her research interests lie in the area of MEMS biosensors with a focus in Bioastronautics applications, more specifically, detection of immune system response in astronauts.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Funding: NASA GSRP, 2004 -2006 (HQ); NASA Co-op, 2003, Biological Systems Office, NASA Johnson Space Center; GEM Fellowship, 2001

Additional info: CU Press Release; 9News Interview; Hispania News, NASA Astronaut Candidate Finalist, 2009

 

PhD Aero August 2006

Thesis Title: Development and Analysis of a Novel Cytokine Biosensor Concept for Astronaut Immune System Monitoring

 

Post Graduation: Lockheed Martin

last updated April 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Steve

 

Steve Chappell, PhD

 

Planetary EVA Design and Operations

Steve achieved a BS in Aerospace engineering from the University of Michigan.  He worked for several years for FAAC, Inc. and moved on to Lockheed Martin as a systems engineer and architect of ground systems for classified programs.  He then returned to graduate school, obtaining a Masters Degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado, concentrating on coursework in Bioastronautics.  Presently, Steve works part-time at the Laboratory for Atmospheric & Space Physics as the Deputy Mission Systems Engineer on the AIM Program.  As a PhD student, Steve is conducting research that will support NASA's new human exploration focus.  His thesis emphasis is on the physiological impacts and workload of human exploration in partial gravity environments, working with the locomotion laboratory of the Department of Integrative Physiology.  Specifically, his research is focused on measuring the energy expenditure associated with inertial mass in simulated partial gravity locomotion.  The specific goal of this research is to better quantify life support resource needs for EVA operations and to improve guidelines for EVA system design that will help to optimize astronaut performance.  Associated interests include development of novel operations concepts and equipment for planetary EVA in challenging terrain, with the overall goal of providing future human explorers a means to access scientifically significant terrain on the Moon and Mars, such as steep sedimentary slopes, while mitigating risk and dealing with contingencies.  In addition to his professional and academic pursuits, Steve has been an active member of Rocky Mountain Rescue for the last 10 years.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: AIAA Foundation Graduate Award, 2005

Additional Info: NASA Astronaut Candidate Finalist, 2009, Member of NASA NEEMO 14 Mission, 2010

 

PhD Aero August 2006

Thesis Title:  Analysis of Planetary Exploration Spacesuit Systems and Evaluation of a Modified Partial-Gravity Simulation Technique

 

Post Graduation: Wyle, NASA JSC - EVA Physiology, Systems, & Performance Project (EPSP), Human Adaptation & Countermeasures

last updated August 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jim

 

James Clawson, PhD

 

Durability and design approaches in the use of flexible transparent polymer films for a Mars greenhouse application

Jim received his Bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Cincinnati.  He worked as a systems engineer for the Department of Defense at GE Aircraft Engines monitoring the production of engines for the B-1, F-14, and F-16 and the development of engine components for the F/A-18E/F.  He transferred to Lockheed Martin Astronautics to monitor the development of the RD-180 rocket engine for the Atlas V launch vehicle family. Concurrently, he began working on a Master's degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Colorado.  After completing his Master’s, he resigned from the DoD and continued towards a PhD with BioServe, where his work has included investigating the use of laser tweezers to study plant gravitropism, studying the antifungal response of mung bean sprouts aboard the Mir space station, and the design, construction, and operation of BioServe’s Plant Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (PGBA) payload. His doctoral research is addressing some of the engineering challenges associated with the design of transparent inflatable structures for a Mars greenhouse application. He mentored the winning design team for the 2002 NASA Marsport Mars Deployable Greenhouse design competition. He also founded the Bioastronautical Systems Development Company, which was awarded an SBIR grant.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. Alex Hoehn

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2000-2003 (KSC); BioServe Space Technologies

 

PhD Aero May 2006

Thesis Title: Feasibility of a Mars Surface Inflatable Greenhouse: Availability of Photosynthetic Irradiance and the Durability of Transparent Polymer Films

Post Graduation: Stellar Solutions, Inc.

last updated 7/10/06

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Heather

 

Heather Howard

Antibiotic Effectiveness in Altered Gravitational Environments

Heather earned her BA in Biochemistry and Managerial Studies from Rice University in 1999.  After graduation, she was employed as a software developer for a few years before returning to graduate school at the University of Colorado.  She completed her MS in Aerospace Engineering and began working toward doctoral studies investigating how microgravity alters antibiotic effectiveness against bacteria before deciding to move on to a professional career.

MS Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2004-2006 (JSC)

 

MS Aero December 2004

 

Post Graduation: The Aerospace Corporation

 

last updated 6/2/06

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jim R

 

James Russell, PhD

 

Advanced Life Support System Optimization

Jim’s research interests are in Human Space Mission Metrics for the selection of Advanced Life Support Technologies as an alternative to the current metric Equivalent System Mass. He participated in the Mars Society’s Mars Desert Research Station as a crewmember (MDRS Crew 27) from March 27 to April 11, 2004 (more info). In addition to his PhD research, he worked as a Research Assistant for BioServe Space Technologies on space flight payloads and on the development of a long term air treatment system for mouse space habitat. He has also supported an undergraduate research project involving biosensor applications of Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Jim is currently a Post Doctoral Research Associate at Purdue University at the ALS NSCORT.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  AIAA Foundation Graduate Award, 2002 and 2005; Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society ‘Grant-in-Aid of Research’ Award, 2003

 

PhD Aero December 2005

Thesis Title:  Expanded Life-Cycle Analysis to Optimize Spacecraft Life Support System Design

 

Post Graduation: Postdoc at Purdue University 2005-06, Lockheed Martin 2006

 

 

 

last updated 10/9/06

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: MattB

 

Matt Bamsey

Foundations of Mars Colonization

Matt Bamsey graduated with a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.  He has spent a number of work terms at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), including a sixteen-month internship, three summers with the CSA Space Science department on Devon Island with the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse project, as well as working for the RADARSAT-2 program. Matt has been active in various space advocacy groups for many years and was president of Mars Society, Canada between 2003 and 2005. He is also the current student advisor to the Mars Institute Board of Advisors. Other interests of Matt's include space history with a focus on Soviet/Russian aspects and space-related political lobbying.  His research interests are focused on Mars colonization and the integration of the numerous disparate disciplines that are required to establish a sustainable colony.

MS Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding:  NASA CRAVE DO6

Additional Info:  CSA Astronaut Candidate (Final 16) 2009, CSA Astronaut Recruit Bio 

MS Aero December 2005

Post Graduation: Canadian Space Agency and PhD Student at the University of Guelph

last updated September 2010

 

 Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Mike

 

Mike Benoit, PhD

 

Characterization of Gravity-Dependent Extracellular Mass Transport Phenomena

Mike received his Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology from the University of New Hampshire and his Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado.  From 1999 through 2002, he worked at BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Research Partnership Center, as a test engineer and also as the lead microbiologist for an experiment that flew onboard the International Space Station during increment 8A.  His PhD work was funded by a Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP) fellowship from NASA Glenn Research Center, where he collaborated with Dr. Emily Nelson in the Computational Microgravity Laboratory to develop numerical model techniques for characterizing the effects of weightlessness on extracellular mass transport phenomena.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2002 - 2005 (GRC NGT3-52386); CU Aerospace Department John A. Vise Award, 2003; AIAA Foundation Graduate Award, 2003

 

PhD Aero August 2005

Thesis Title: Responses, Applications, and Analysis of Microgravity Effects on Bacteria

 

Post Graduation: Postdoc at Stanford University 2006-10, Codexis 2010

 

last updated May 2010

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Hans

 

Hans Seelig, PhD

Non-Contact Techniques for Detection of Water Stress in Plants for Space Flight Growth Chamber Application

Hans received his Bachelor’s degree in Automation Technologies at the Hochschule TuW (FH) in Dresden/Germany (06/97), concentrating on biomedical engineering. He worked for several years for the University Hospital in Dresden and for the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Systems in Dresden, participating in various research projects involving non-contact measurement methods. In 1999 Hans came to the University of Colorado for graduate studies, obtaining his Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences in May 2001. From 1999 to 2005 Hans worked for BioServe Space Technologies as Research Assistant. He participated in the upgrade of BioServe’s space plant growth chamber (PGBA) for long term missions in controller optimization and launch preparations for an experiment that flew on the International Space Station in 2002 for about 8 weeks. Hans’ research. involved utilizing plants for advanced life support, in particular using remote sensing techniques for monitoring plant health. His dissertation focused on the development of non-contact techniques for detecting water deficit stress in plants.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. Alex Hoehn

Research Funding: BioServe Space Technologies

 

PhD Aero August 2005

Thesis Title: The Assessment of Water Deficit Stress in Plants using Optical Measurement Methods

 

Post Graduation: Postdoc at NIST 2006-09, Professor at University of Dresden, Germany 2009

last updated July 2009

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: James

 

James Manley

 

Assessing the Effect of Simulated Weightlessness on a Neutrally Buoyant Strain of E. coli

James received his Bachelor’s in EPO Biology and is now pursuing a career in Aerospace Medicine. His research focused on non-invasively monitoring lag phase of E. coli in simulated weightless conditions through the use of a clinostat. He also developed an optical density monitoring apparatus for use during clinorotation to aid in data collection for his research.

Research Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus (with Mike Benoit)

Project Funding: URAP, 2003/04; UROP, 2004/05

 

BS EPO Biology May 2005

Post Graduation: Medical School, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD

 

 

last updated May 2005

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Galina

 

Galina Dvorkina

Characterizing the Influence of Gravity on Bacterial Sedimentation and Motility

Galina is double majoring in Aerospace Engineering and EPO Biology.  Her research objectives for this project are focused on measuring bacterial sedimentation rates in order to empirically determine cell density as a function of velocity, cell size and known fluid properties.   Galina successfully designed and assembled a vertical video microscopy system and validated its general performance.

Research Advisor:  Dr. David Klaus (with Heather Howard)

Project Funding: UROP, 2004/05

 

 

 

last updated May 2005

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Ken

 

Ken Stroud, PhD

 

Mitigation of Vestibular Disturbances in Piloted Spacecraft

Ken received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1997.  Upon graduation, he began working for Wyle Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center in the Systems Development group, and later as a Biomedical Flight Controller (BME) working in the Mission Control Center.  In August of 2000, Ken returned to the University of Colorado at Boulder, and in December of 2001 received his M.S. in Aerospace Engineering, with an emphasis on Bioastronautics.  During 2002 and 2003, he worked in the Mission Operations group at BioServe Space Technologies, providing console support on the ISS 9A and 11A increments, and the STS-107 mission.  Ken’s Ph.D. thesis entails the effects of weightlessness on the vestibular system.  Specifically, his dissertation involved the development of countermeasures against vestibular disturbances during space flight using virtual reality and defining spacecraft design requirements. He completed a study on the prediction and prevention of motion sickness and disorientation in a microgravity-like virtual environment using 40 human test subjects at the NASA Johnson Space Center, and investigated the effect of spacecraft and cockpit design factors on the ability to safely land a piloted reentry vehicle.

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2002-2005 (JSC NAG9-1438); AIAA Willy Z. Sadeh Award, 2002

 

PhD Aero December 2004

Thesis Title:  Mitigating Vestibular Disturbances During Spaceflight Using Virtual Reality Training and Reentry Vehicle Design Guidelines

 

Post Graduation: NASA Johnson Space Center, Sierra Nevada Corp.

last updated June 2012

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Tom

 

Tom Hatfield, PhD

 

Quantitative Ultrasound Technology Development for Space Flight Biomedical Applications

Tom obtained his BS in Aerospace Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1992 and his Masters degree in Industrial Engineering at the University of Houston in 1998.  From 1992 to 1996 he also worked in various engineering roles for IBM, Loral, and Lockheed Martin supporting the shuttle and station programs, as well as the Mission Control Center in Houston. His MS research involved computer modeling for the Advanced Life Support program at the Johnson Space Center. These experiences led Tom to move to Colorado to pursue graduate studies at CU in 1999.  In the summer of 2002, he began to work full-time on his PhD thesis under a NASA GSRP fellowship. As doctoral candidate, Tom's research focused on using ultrasound to determine cross-sectional area of limb muscle and bone, and included demonstrating the potential of ultrasound for measurements during spaceflight. 

PhD Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2002-2004 (JSC NAG9-1468); AIAA Foundation Graduate Award, 2003

 

PhD Aero December 2004

Thesis Title:  Development of Novel Ultrasonic Physiological Measurement Methodologies Appropriate for Space Flight   

 

Post Graduation: Wyle Life Sciences, NASA Johnson Space Center

last updated Jan 2005

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Juniper

 

Juniper Jairala

Effects of Space Flight on Sleep

Juniper graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. She then worked for Universal Studios and Warner Brothers building theme parks in Japan and Spain. Her passion for space exploration returned her the U.S., where she worked at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center as a Flight Operations Engineer. Finally, realizing that her true quest was to help improve spaceflight for humans, and that she needed a graduate degree to do this, Juniper came to the CU Boulder Aerospace Engineering Sciences Bioastronautics Research Group.  Her primary research interests are astronaut physiology and space medicine/countermeasures. She worked in the Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory in CU's Integrative Physiology department, putting electrodes on people's heads and watching their brainwaves while they sleep. She hopes to figure out, through the use of microgravity analogs, ways to improve how astronauts sleep in space.

Research Funding: GEM Fellowship; National Institute of Health (NIH) Initiative for Minority Student Development (IMSD), 2003; NIH Fellowship, 2005

 

MS Aero December 2004

 

Post Graduation: co-op at NASA JSC spring 05; internship at Blue Origin summer 05; beginning PhD program at UCLA Fall 05, X-Prize Foundation, SpaceX, Andrews Space, Jacobs Engineering at NASA JSC

last updated October 2008

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Jackson

 

Jackson Lee

 

Hydrogen Recovery from Spacecraft Biomass Waste

Jackson received a BSME in mechanical engineering from Rice University in 2002.  His interests are in the area of Advanced Life Support (ALS) for manned spacecraft, in particular, the applications of environmental microbiology and biotechnology in ALS. He has worked previously with BioServe Space Technologies and Lockheed-Martin in manned spaceflight and ALS activities.  His thesis involved an experiment examining the use of photoheterotrophic bacteria in a photofermentation hydrogen production scheme for a mars/ lunar base for his MS thesis.  This project was jointly supported by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado.

MS Thesis Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding: NASA GSRP Fellowship, 2003-2004 (JSC NAG9-1555); Beverly Sears Graduate Student Grant, 2004; NSF EAPSI Fellowship to Japan, 2004

 

MS Aero August 2004

Thesis Title: Characterization of the Effect of Butyrate on Hydrogen Production in Biophotolysis for use in Martian Resource Recovery

 

Post Graduation: Served as a member of the Peace Corps in the Philippines, PhD student at CSM

last updated August 2007

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Markus

 

Markus Czupalla, PhD

 

Spacecraft Advanced Life Support Systems

Markus received his Diplom (FH)/BS in Aerospace Engineering from the Aachen University of Applied Sciences (AcUAS). As an undergraduate he dealt mainly with the mechanical design, analyses and optimization of lightweight structures. Being interested in human spaceflight Markus continued his education in 2002 in the Bioastonautics program at CU, where he completed his MS in 2003 (see Funnel Article, p.30). At CU Markus developed an interest in Life Support Systems (LSS) being part of the ASEN 5116 Spacecraft Life Support Systems focusing on the conceptual design of physio/chemical LSS. Markus continued his research investigating bioregenerative LSS from 2003 to 2004 at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne. He conducted further LSS research as member of the Project Boreas team where he was responsible for the conceptual design of a Mars North Pole LSS. The Project Boreas report was shortlisted for the 2007 Sir Arthur Clarke Award in the category of "Best Written Presentation". Having explored the state of the art static LSS design approaches, Markus decided to pursue a PhD at the Technische Universität München (TUM) Human Spaceflight Research Group. His PhD research topic is the integrated and dynamic LSS design. For this purpose he is developing a simulation called the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) which aims at the depiction of transient LSS parameters to allow increased robustness in the early studies of static LSS designs. .

MS Advisor: Dr. David Klaus

Research Funding (while at CU): Fulbright Scholarship

MS Aero CU, 2003

Dipl.Ing (FH) AcUAS - August 2004 - Advisor: Dr. Gerda Horneck

PhD Advisor: Dr. Ulrich Walter, TUM

PhD TUM, 2011

Additional info: Aachen University of Applied Sciences Highest Honors - Best of Class, 2004; Finalist in the 2009 ESA Astronaut Selection

Post Graduation: Employed since 2004 with Kayser-Threde as a structural and thermal systems engineer for space applications

 

last updated December 2011

 

 

Return to home page for David Klaus